The Evolution of BITs

CogwheelInternational investment regime, like any other field of international law, is not static. It continues to evolve and adapt to the present day needs and situation. States as the primary actors of the regime maintain full control in its evolution.

Historically, bilateral investment treaties (BITs) emerged as a response to the inadequacies of international law on protection of property of foreigners. Western states also sought to obtain better market access for their nationals to invest in developing states. See more explanation on the history of BITs here.

Germany is the first state to sign the first BIT, with Pakistan, in 1959. Other states quickly followed this effort: Switzerland in 1961, the Netherlands in 1963, Italy in 1964 and Sweden in 1965. BITs in this period were generally quite short – approximately five to six pages. These BITs focus on core protection such as the obligation to accord non-discriminatory and fair and equitable treatment to foreign investors.

Early on, BITs began providing for binding ISDS in the form of international arbitration. However, international arbitration has been used to resolve claims from foreign investors with respect to their property since the 18th century.

In recent years some states have begun adopting new model BITs which are more elaborate than older treaties. The most recent one is India, where its 2015 model BIT provides more detailed ISDS provisions, among others setting time limit of submitting a claim to ISDS and possibilities of counter-claims by a state against a foreign investor. And the Norway 2007 Model BIT provides for example that the unsuccessful party in ISDS shall bear the costs of arbitration.

The ISDS blog has previously discussed some ISDS reforms embodied in the Comprehensive Trade and Economic Agreement between the European Union and Canada (CETA) and the US 2012 Model BIT.