Combating Climate Change through ISDS

White lily in an environment of green leaves on waterAn article demonstrates how ISDS provides the necessary tools to improve regulatory stability and predictability necessary for low-carbon investment. According to the author, ISDS has the potential to protect low-carbon investments against the risk of regulatory changes that can affect climate policies.

The text takes its starting point at the importance of private capital and technology in the transition to a low-carbon economy. The Kyoto Protocol establishes different implementation mechanisms for State parties to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, mechanisms in which private actors play important roles. In turn, governments may also establish different support schemes for investment in low-carbon technology. Some of the common schemes are guaranteed a minimum price for electricity produced by renewable resources (the so-called feed-in tariff) and investment aid for renewable energy producers.

The article points out some risks for low-carbon investment, including that authorities could withdraw the promised support or shorten its duration.

It further argues that some substantive protections under international investment agreements may play an important role.

One example is the ISDS case, Nykomb v. Latvia. In this case, the tribunal found that the government provided support scheme for low-carbon installations operated by domestic investors, but not for installations operated by foreign investors. The tribunal held that this amounted to discrimination, and the investor obtained compensation.

The article concludes that climate law and investment law are based on comparable principles but having different perspectives. Climate law creates rights and expectations for investors, while investment law aims to protect them. In turn, investment arbitration has the potential to limit the instability that currently affects the implementation of climate change mitigation policies.