Just published: Peter Allard v. Canada

Blogg_v41A much-anticipated award is now released for public, Peter A. Allard v Barbados.

As we have written before, a Canadian investor, Peter Allard, brought a claim against Barbados in Permanent Court of Arbitration in 2010. The case concerned Mr Allard’s environmental sanctuary in coastal Barbados. He grounded his claim on the failure of the government of Barbados to enforce its own environmental law which, as a result, has polluted his sanctuary.

The investor claimed that the government’s failure amounted to violation of Canada – Barbados Bilateral Investment Treaty.

In an award rendered in June 2016, the tribunal rejected the investor’s claim on all grounds.

The tribunal disagreed with the investor that Barbados has failed to accord him full protection and security by failing to prevent pollution from coming to the sanctuary. As a departing point, the tribunal asserted that the obligation of the State to provide the investment with full protection and security standard is of ”due diligence” and ”reasonable care” – not of strict liability.

In this case, the tribunal found that Barbadian officials have taken reasonable steps to protect the sanctuary. Among others, the tribunal pointed out that the officials established a committee tasked with developing plans for preservation of the sanctuary.

The claim of expropriation was also dismissed. The tribunal concluded that there was no substantial deprivation of the investment since the investor remains the owner of the sanctuary and operates a cafe there. The tribunal further referred to the investor’s statement during the hearing that ”there is some kind of business remaining there”.

Meanwhile, Simon Lester, a trade policy analyst for Cato Institute, argues that the case sends an important signal for environmental protection. According to him, the legal standard in BIT may pave the way for future cases that environmentalists could help investors bring against governments who may do too little to protect the environment. An example mentioned is if the impact of climate change, for instance rising sea level, caused damage to an investor’s property.