Category Archives: SCC

New report on investment arbitration

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The Arbitration Institute of the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce (SCC) has published a new report prepared by legal counsel Celeste E. Salinas Quero. She describes, among others, the economic sectors involved, the states’ measures most frequently challenged by investors, the outcomes and costs of investment disputes under the SCC Rules.

SCC is a preferred venue for investment arbitrations. Over the past 20 years, the SCC has administered and acted as appointing authority in more than 90 investment arbitrations, both in small-sized and in large-scale disputes.

The report shows that most awards have been rendered in favor of respondent states, with 21% of tribunals declining jurisdiction, 37% denying all of the investor’s claims and 42% of tribunals upholding the investor’s claims in part or in full. As regards costs, the report reveals that while “splitting the baby” is a common approach taken by tribunals, most tribunals allocate and apportion the costs between the parties in a proportion that reflects each party’s relative success and conduct throughout the proceedings.

Read the full article below.

Article: Investor-state disputes at the SCC – by Celeste E. Salinas Quero

Bridging the Climate Change Policy Gap

BLoggIt is clear that to fight climate change, we need to scale up green investment both in terms of amount and geographical reach. However, climate change law, in this case the United Nations Conference Framework on Climate Change and the recently-signed Paris Agreement, do not specifically include terms to promote and protect investment. This is a policy gap.

The SCC, together with the International Bar Association, the International Chamber of Commerce and the Permanent Court of Arbitration, took an initiative to discuss this gap by organising a conference, Bridging the Climate Change Policy Gap: The Role of International Law and Arbitration, in Stockholm on 21 November.

It is noted during the conference that around USD 100 billion in investment over the next fifteen years is needed to combat climate change – a target that is considered achievable. Another speaker emphasised that there is no shortage of capital to address climate change. The challenge is how to get investors to actually invest and how to match the capital with the green investments.

It appeared to be a consensus among the speakers that good policy is key to attracting sustainable investments. Policy needs to be long-term and stable. Short-term policies, often associated with government’s turnover, caused bad impacts, from high transaction costs to the fact that the industry had to fire and re-hire employees depending on how policy is.

A panel of lawyers discussed how litigation has been used to fight climate change, directly and indirectly. Among other things, renewable energy investors have resorted to international arbitration to bring a claim against government for unstable policies and revocation of incentives. Another case being discussed in depth was Urgenda Foundation v. the Netherlands where a Dutch district court ruled that the government has breached its duty of care to its citizens by not doing enough to address climate change.

It may be foreseen that these types of cases, both in domestic and international fora, will propel the right type of government actions.

A report from the conference with more details will be published soon.

 

ISDS transparency in draft SCC Rules 2017

BloggReglerThe Arbitration Institute at the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce (SCC) turns 100 years in 2017. During this year, the SCC will update its rules for arbitration, and a draft version of those updated rules has now been published. Among the novelties is an annex applicable only to ISDS disputes, which expressly allows for non-parties to participate in an arbitration.

Among the arbitration institutions which administer ISDS cases under their own rules, the SCC is second only to ICSID. These SCC cases are currently governed by the 2010 version of the SCC Rules, but a committee has now published the updated draft version.

The committee consists of in-house counsel, academics and practicing lawyers from both Sweden and nine other jurisdictions. The proposal contains a number of new elements, but from an ISDS perspective it is noteworthy that the new draft rules include a special annex for ISDS disputes. Under this annex, non-disputing parties are expressly given an avenue to provide the tribunal with written submissions. This applies to both third parties and to the investor’s home state.

The proposed provisions on submission by third parties mirror the UNCITRAL Transparency Rules from 2014.

The draft rules will be presented and discussed at a public hearing 9 June in Stockholm.