Tag Archives: Investment protection

When States file claims against investors in ISDS

CounterclaimsMost ISDS disputes are based on agreement between states, usually bilateral investment treaties (BITs), which aim to provide protection under international law to foreign investors. Since only states are parties to the agreements, it is also only states that have obligations under these agreements. Obligations aimed to give rights to foreign investors. Therefore ISDS clauses are designed so that a proceeding can only be initiated by the foreign investor, not by the state. But there are exceptions.

A state that is being sued may respond by claiming that the investor also breached its obligation, through a counterclaim. This is possible under most investment agreements and arbitration rules as long as the state’s counterclaim is clearly connected with the main dispute. There are many examples of counterclaims, but a notable case is Ecuador’s successful counterclaim against Perenco.

This high-profile ISDS case was an ICSID proceeding in which Perenco initially brought a claim against Ecuador due to changes in Ecuadorian legislation, which, according to Perenco, violated its rights under the investment agreement. Ecuador launched a counterclaim against Perenco, claiming that Perenco violated Ecuadorian environmental legislation, including by not informing the state of several oil spills. According to Ecuador, the failure had led to several environmental disasters in the Amazon, and Ecuadorian environmental laws provide that the company must reimburse the state with USD 2.5 billion for cleaning up of the spills.

The tribunal in Perenco v. Ecuador issued a decision in which they indicated that Ecuador’s allegations at first sight seemed justified but that it was unlikely that the damages could be as large as USD 2.5 billion. Although the tribunal seemed to agree with Ecuador’s argument, it also viewed that it would require a long and expensive investigation to determine the damages, and encouraged the parties to reach a settlement. Negotiations are still ongoing. Meanwhile, Ecuador has launched counterclaims against another energy company with similar factual circumstances, and the case is also still pending.

States have also brought claims against investors directly, which is possible under the ICSID Arbitration Rules. There have been ICSID cases in which the state sued the foreign investor for alleged breach of contract, such as Gabon v. Société Serete S.A. and Tanzania Electric Supply Co. Ltd. v. IPTL (which was launched by Tanzania’s state owned power company, but where, in practice, the state stood behind the process). Another example is when East Kalimantan (a province of Indonesia) launched an ICSID case against several coal mining companies having operation in the province, arguing that these companies had a divestment obligation. The tribunal found that it did not have jurisdiction to hear the dispute. In these types of cases, it is common that the case is not based on agreements between states, but a direct agreement between the state and the investor.

Investment Treaty Forum in Stockholm

ITFSeminarThe Investment Treaty Forum was recently held for the first time in Stockholm.

The British Institute of International and Comparative Law, in cooperation with the SCC, Mannheimer Swartling and Uppsala University, organized Investment Treaty Forum in Stockholm on 12 June 2015.

The Investment Treaty Forum was founded in 2004 with the aim to provide a global centre for serious high level debate in the field of international law. The theme of the meeting – Europe as an Investment Treaty Actor – brought together speakers and participants from government, legal practitioners, academia, politicians and business. See the full program here.

The importance of investment treaty for European economic development was one of the topics discussed. Investment treaty contributes to predictability, stability and transparency in investment relation. It was further highlighted that investment treaty will benefit not only the industry, but also governments and consumers. Investment treaty has the potential to open up new market opportunities for European investors abroad and also to make Europe a more attractive place for investment. But there were also critical voices raised, questioning the need for investment protection.

The evolution of substantive terms of investment treaty was equally addressed. States retain full control of the regime, among others by issuing interpretation of the treaty and by introducing new provisions of investment protection. The former has been done by the state parties to the North American Free Trade Agreement and the latter by, among others, the European Commission.

The seminar ended with the well-anticipated discussion on the roles of the European Commission in investment law regime. In addition to its role as negotiator of future investment treaty, the Commission has also emerged as litigator and enforcer in the regime.

More pictures and presentation materials from the seminar will be published here shortly.

 Photo: Björn Leijon