Tag Archives: Philip Morris

Philip Morris Asia Limited v. Australia  

Cigarette on the foreground and many cigarettes on a backgroundOur next case summary is Philip Morris Asia Limited v. the Commonwealth of Australia. This summary is prepared based on the publicly-available award rendered on 17 December 2015.

The claimant in this case was Philip Morris Asia Limited (PM Asia), a Hong Kong-registered company. As a result of a corporate restructuring within the Philip Morris group in 2011, PM Asia acquired indirect ownership in an Australian subsidiary, Philip Morris Limited (PML), which sells tobacco products in Australia under different brands.

The dispute arose from the introduction of the so-called plain packaging legislation for tobacco products sold in Australia which aims to reduce smoking. The legislation in essence prohibits use of trademarks, symbols, graphic or images on tobacco products and packaging. Tobacco packaging may only display the name of the tobacco company in standard font and size and this means that it may be difficult for consumers to distinguish one brand from another.

PM Asia initiated an arbitration proceeding under the UNCITRAL Arbitration Rules at the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague in 2011 on grounds that the plain packaging legislation had restricted the use of trademarks by PML on its tobacco packaging.  This restriction, according to PM Asia, constituted an expropriation under Australia –Hong Kong bilateral investment treaty (BIT).

Australia submitted jurisdictional objections, among others things, that PMA’s investment in PML was made only in order to be able to bring an arbitration claim under the BIT. PM Asia commenced the arbitration shortly after it acquired PML and therefore, according to Australia, this should be considered an abuse of rights.

In a recently-published jurisdictional award, the tribunal noted that, based on case law, an arbitration claim constitutes an abuse of rights when an investor has changed its corporate structure to gain the protection of an investment treaty at a point when a specific dispute was foreseeable.

In this particular case, the tribunal observed that PM Asia was aware that the Australian government would pursue the plain packaging policy when it acquired PML. The government had signalled its intention to introduce this policy as early as in 2008, and therefore the dispute was considered to be foreseeable to PM Asia. The tribunal further found that evidence showed that the main and determinative reason for the corporate restructuring was the intention to bring a claim under the BIT, using the Hong Kong entity as claimant.

Based on these facts, the tribunal dismissed the claim on grounds that the commencement of the arbitration by PM Asia constituted an abuse of rights.