Tag Archives: policy

Bridging the Climate Change Policy Gap

BLoggIt is clear that to fight climate change, we need to scale up green investment both in terms of amount and geographical reach. However, climate change law, in this case the United Nations Conference Framework on Climate Change and the recently-signed Paris Agreement, do not specifically include terms to promote and protect investment. This is a policy gap.

The SCC, together with the International Bar Association, the International Chamber of Commerce and the Permanent Court of Arbitration, took an initiative to discuss this gap by organising a conference, Bridging the Climate Change Policy Gap: The Role of International Law and Arbitration, in Stockholm on 21 November.

It is noted during the conference that around USD 100 billion in investment over the next fifteen years is needed to combat climate change – a target that is considered achievable. Another speaker emphasised that there is no shortage of capital to address climate change. The challenge is how to get investors to actually invest and how to match the capital with the green investments.

It appeared to be a consensus among the speakers that good policy is key to attracting sustainable investments. Policy needs to be long-term and stable. Short-term policies, often associated with government’s turnover, caused bad impacts, from high transaction costs to the fact that the industry had to fire and re-hire employees depending on how policy is.

A panel of lawyers discussed how litigation has been used to fight climate change, directly and indirectly. Among other things, renewable energy investors have resorted to international arbitration to bring a claim against government for unstable policies and revocation of incentives. Another case being discussed in depth was Urgenda Foundation v. the Netherlands where a Dutch district court ruled that the government has breached its duty of care to its citizens by not doing enough to address climate change.

It may be foreseen that these types of cases, both in domestic and international fora, will propel the right type of government actions.

A report from the conference with more details will be published soon.

 

Philip Morris Asia Limited v. Australia  

Cigarette on the foreground and many cigarettes on a backgroundOur next case summary is Philip Morris Asia Limited v. the Commonwealth of Australia. This summary is prepared based on the publicly-available award rendered on 17 December 2015.

The claimant in this case was Philip Morris Asia Limited (PM Asia), a Hong Kong-registered company. As a result of a corporate restructuring within the Philip Morris group in 2011, PM Asia acquired indirect ownership in an Australian subsidiary, Philip Morris Limited (PML), which sells tobacco products in Australia under different brands.

The dispute arose from the introduction of the so-called plain packaging legislation for tobacco products sold in Australia which aims to reduce smoking. The legislation in essence prohibits use of trademarks, symbols, graphic or images on tobacco products and packaging. Tobacco packaging may only display the name of the tobacco company in standard font and size and this means that it may be difficult for consumers to distinguish one brand from another.

PM Asia initiated an arbitration proceeding under the UNCITRAL Arbitration Rules at the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague in 2011 on grounds that the plain packaging legislation had restricted the use of trademarks by PML on its tobacco packaging.  This restriction, according to PM Asia, constituted an expropriation under Australia –Hong Kong bilateral investment treaty (BIT).

Australia submitted jurisdictional objections, among others things, that PMA’s investment in PML was made only in order to be able to bring an arbitration claim under the BIT. PM Asia commenced the arbitration shortly after it acquired PML and therefore, according to Australia, this should be considered an abuse of rights.

In a recently-published jurisdictional award, the tribunal noted that, based on case law, an arbitration claim constitutes an abuse of rights when an investor has changed its corporate structure to gain the protection of an investment treaty at a point when a specific dispute was foreseeable.

In this particular case, the tribunal observed that PM Asia was aware that the Australian government would pursue the plain packaging policy when it acquired PML. The government had signalled its intention to introduce this policy as early as in 2008, and therefore the dispute was considered to be foreseeable to PM Asia. The tribunal further found that evidence showed that the main and determinative reason for the corporate restructuring was the intention to bring a claim under the BIT, using the Hong Kong entity as claimant.

Based on these facts, the tribunal dismissed the claim on grounds that the commencement of the arbitration by PM Asia constituted an abuse of rights.

IIA reform continues

IIAsBlogStates continue to sign new international investment agreements (IIAs) in recent years, where by the end of 2015, the IIA universe consisted of 3,286 agreements. Among these agreements, 2,928 are bilateral investment treaties (BITs) and 358 are other IIAs (for example, trade agreements with investment chapters).

At the same time, as many as at least sixty countries have developed or are developing new model IIAs.

Here we bring out some progress of the reform.

As noted by the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) in its latest report, IIA reform is happening against the backdrop of the global trend to formulate a “new generation of investment policies” that place inclusive growth and sustainable development at the heart of efforts to attract and benefit from investment.

In general, most of the new models include provisions safeguarding the right to regulate, including for sustainable development objectives. It is also clear that states intend to move away from the “protection (only) model” to a more balanced “investment for sustainable development” model.

India’s new model BIT is particularly interesting because it includes some provisions not found in many other BITs. For instance, it promotes transparency by requiring states to ensure that all laws and regulations are published or available for those who are interested. This model also tries to provide more balance in the state-investor relationship by providing obligations to foreign investor, which consists of requirement to comply with host state’s laws, including environmental and human rights law. It further mandates foreign investors to voluntarily incorporate internationally-recognized standards of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in their practices and internal policies.

Meanwhile, the Netherlands model BIT excludes “mailbox” companies from the scope of the BIT. Finally, the recently-signed Trans-Pacific Partnership includes some clarification on expropriation provisions and a special denial of benefits clause for tobacco-related claims.

More environmental languages in IIAs

green leaves background in sunny dayInternational investment agreements (“IIAs”) have increasingly addressed environmental concerns related to investment activity.

Based on a survey conducted by the OECD, inclusion of environmental languages in IIAs is becoming more common. The sample in this survey consists of 1,623 international investment agreements, thus covering roughly half of the global investment treaty population.

The first treaty to include environmental language in the sample is the 1985 China – Singapore BIT. In 2008, 89% of newly concluded treaties includes such language. Further, as we have written before, sustainable development is at the heart of the newly-adopted IIAs in 2014 where most of these treaties include a sustainable development-oriented features.

The most common environmental language is a provision which preserves policy space for environmental regulation. For example, Hungary – Russia BIT provides that the agreement does not preclude the application of measures to protect the environment and public health. Another type is a provision which discourages state parties to lower their environmental standards to attract investments.

Some IIAs have referred to international environmental treaties. The Energy Charter Treaty in its preamble specifically recalls the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. The preamble of the new Norwegian BIT draft also recognizes that international environmental treaties are to be interpreted in mutually supportive manner.

Overall, 30 of the 49 countries covered by the survey have included environmental language in at least one of their IIAs. Canada is the country with relatively highest tendencies to include such language (83% of its sample treaties), followed by New Zealand, Japan, the United States and Finland.