Tag Archives: Rules

ICSID asks the public for input

Blogg_v07ICSID is the World Bank body which administers investor-state arbitrations. In October 2016 the ICSID Secretariat initiated the work with updating the ICSID Arbitration Rules (the last time this was done was in 2006). As part of that work, a public invitation has been circulated in order to compile views from a wide spectrum of the public, including, of course, the contracting states.

The changes that will be made to the rules depend largely on the proposals coming from the public but one stated objective is to make ICSID proceedings more time and cost effective, while still ensuring due process and equal treatment of the parties.

ICSID arbitrations are in fact governed by two sets of rules. The 1965 ICSID Convention sets the outer frames of the proceedings, while the ICSID Arbitration Rules govern the more detailed procedural issues. The Convention acts as the “constitution” of ICSID and has 161 contracting states. Since every state needs to consent to any change, the ICSID Convention is not likely to be changed anytime soon. The Arbitration Rules, however, do not need the consent of every contracting state and are therefore more flexible.

Practical guide: information about ISDS

Books close up are on the tableIt could be difficult to get an overview of what happens in the ISDS world. This is because the international nature of this field and the fact that it lacks centralized information system. However, things are happening fast – new arbitral awards are rendered and states are concluding and terminating international investment agreements (IIAs)

We offer some practical guides to ISDS through the following sources.

 

Free services:

Italaw

The website, which has been around for a long time, publishes arbitral awards and other documents from ISDS proceedings. Researchers at the University of Victoria are managing the website. If you search for a particular ISDS dispute on the internet, it is often that Italaw comes first, which may indicate that the website has been visited a lot.

UNCTAD

The website of the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development provides user-friendly search functions for both arbitral awards and IIAs that contain ISDS as dispute settlement mechanism. In addition, it publishes reports on new updates and statistics on IIAs and ISDS.

PluriCourts Investment Treaty Arbitration Database (PITAD)

PITAD is a database project of all known ISDS cases, currently under construction by the University of Oslo. The database can be accessed via a request to the responsible researchers.  The researchers behind the project takes empirical approach and uses coded variables to classify hundreds of well-known arbitral awards.

ICSID and PCA

ICSID administers most ISDS cases and automatically publishes information about them (as long as the parties do not actively object to it). PCA, on the other hand, publishes information with the consent of the parties. Both organizations have searchable databases.

 

Service with paid subscription

Investment Arbitrator Reporter

This website publishes news and information about ISDS. IAReporter engages in ongoing investigative reporting, which leads to their reporting on many cases, awards and developments that are otherwise confidential. IAReporter also offers in-depth summaries and analysis of awards and decisions, which could be helpful for those who do not want to read the hundred-pages awards. In principle, one must pay for subscription, however IAReporter also provides free trials and discounts for those who cannot gain access otherwise.

Global Arbitration Review

This publication primarily targets legal practitioners in the arbitration field – but often publishes interesting interviews and summaries of proceedings for those interested in learning more about the practical sides of ISDS work.

ISDS transparency in draft SCC Rules 2017

BloggReglerThe Arbitration Institute at the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce (SCC) turns 100 years in 2017. During this year, the SCC will update its rules for arbitration, and a draft version of those updated rules has now been published. Among the novelties is an annex applicable only to ISDS disputes, which expressly allows for non-parties to participate in an arbitration.

Among the arbitration institutions which administer ISDS cases under their own rules, the SCC is second only to ICSID. These SCC cases are currently governed by the 2010 version of the SCC Rules, but a committee has now published the updated draft version.

The committee consists of in-house counsel, academics and practicing lawyers from both Sweden and nine other jurisdictions. The proposal contains a number of new elements, but from an ISDS perspective it is noteworthy that the new draft rules include a special annex for ISDS disputes. Under this annex, non-disputing parties are expressly given an avenue to provide the tribunal with written submissions. This applies to both third parties and to the investor’s home state.

The proposed provisions on submission by third parties mirror the UNCITRAL Transparency Rules from 2014.

The draft rules will be presented and discussed at a public hearing 9 June in Stockholm.

Arbitrators’ Independence and Impartiality

ArbitratorsBlogThe parties in an ISDS case select the arbitrators that resolve their dispute. Arbitration law and institutional rules provide layers of control mechanisms to ensure the impartiality and independence of these arbitrators.

The SCC Arbitration Rules require that every arbitrator must be impartial and independent. This requirement extends from the outset and throughout the proceeding. Prior to appointment, an arbitrator must disclose any circumstances which may give rise to justifiable doubts as to his or her impartiality or independence. Further, a party to a dispute may challenge an arbitrator during the course of the proceedings, if new circumstances arise or facts come to light that lead the party to doubt the arbitrator’s independence or impartiality.

Most institutions, including the SCC, evaluate challenges to arbitrators under an objective standard – that is, the arbitrator is disqualified if the circumstances, from the point of view of a reasonable third person, give rise to a conflict of interest. In other words, it is not necessary to show that the challenged arbitrator in fact lacks independence and impartiality, but rather that there is an appearance of partiality.

In arbitrations administered by the SCC, the SCC Board makes the final decision on arbitrator challenges. In evaluating challenges, the Board may refer to the International Bar Association Guidelines on Conflict of Interest in International Arbitration (“IBA Guidelines”). The IBA Guidelines list specific situations in which an arbitrator should decline an appointment, or step down if already appointed.

For example, the SCC Board sustained a respondent’s challenge to an arbitrator appointed by claimant because the arbitrator’s firm had been involved in matters both for and against the respondent. The arbitrator was released from the appointment. Read this article for more information on challenges in SCC cases.

The ICSID Convention, developed by States, provides that an arbitrator can be dismissed if he or she manifests a lack of the qualities required to sit as an arbitrator. A proposal to disqualify an arbitrator was upheld in Bluebank v. Venezuela, on the ground that the arbitrator appointed by claimant worked in a law firm that represented other claimants in unrelated ICSID cases against Venezuela.

Under the ICSID Convention, an ISDS award may be annulled if the tribunal was not properly constituted. This may include situations where an arbitrator failed to disclose potential conflicts of interest before or during the arbitration.

The UN adopts Convention to enhance ISDS transparency

On 10 December 2014, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Convention on Transparency in Treaty-based Investor-State Arbitration. The Convention will be open for signature on 17 March 2015.

The new Convention is to take into account the public interest involved in an ISDS by giving the public access to documents and the opportunity to participate in the ISDS proceeding. It has been globally recognized that transparency will promote predictability and accountability.

Previously, in 2013, the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) adopted Rules on Transparency in Treaty-based Investor-State Arbitration.

As a general rule, the Transparency Rules are set to apply to ISDS proceeding under future investment treaties, concluded after 1 April 2014. However, thanks to the newly adopted Convention, the impact of the UNCITRAL Transparency Rules will become more far-reaching, by making it possible for States to apply the rules to ISDS cases arising also under any of the 3,000 investment agreements concluded also before 1 April 2014. The Transparency Rules may also apply to ISDS cases decided under arbitration rules different from the UNCITRAL Arbitration Rules.

Salient features of the Transparency Rules:

  1. All documents related to the arbitration proceedings shall be made public, including notice of claims, submissions by parties, transcript of hearings and the award.
  2. Hearings should be open to the public; the public may also attend through video links.
  3. The tribunal may allow written submission of a non-party to the dispute about a matter within dispute.

It may be noted that also before the adoption of this Convention, transparency and public participation have existed in ISDS. For instance, the NAFTA countries United States, Canada and Mexico have agreed that all ISDS cases under the NAFTA shall be made transparent, and that tribunals should provide opportunities for submissions from non-disputing parties.

However, the new Convention forwards a level of transparency that is unprecedented in international arbitration. With the new rules, ISDS will be more transparent than most domestic courts.

The adoption of the Convention demonstrates how ISDS reform is entirely possible – and under way.